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Chalice (Echinophyllia) Fragging 101

Discussion in 'Coral Propagation and Aquaculture' started by mikejrice, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. mikejrice

    mikejrice Sardine Platinum Sponsor M.A.S.C Club Member

    Methodology:

    The method I use for fragging the majority of hard corals is primarily the same with the cutting tooling being an Inland band saw.

    Cooling liquid used is fresh mixed saltwater with enough iodine to color it a light amber. This helps to disinfect cuts as they're made which has shown to greatly increase frag survival.

    All corals are stored during cutting in a small bucket holding water taken directly from their home aquarium. This water is used both to keep them wet as well as for rinsing any flesh away from cuts while I'm working on them.

    All finished, and rinsed, frags or trimmed colonies are soaked in Brightwell Aquatics Restor dip to insure that minimal flesh is lost.

    Both soak buckets are rinsed and replenished between colonies to reduce the risk of interactions between loose flesh of different coral species.

    Notes about Chalice (Echinophyllia):

    Chalice corals have some of the most delicate of skeletal structures which means that extreme care must be taken throughout the process from the time of cutting to when frags are secured to plugs or other mounts. Many of the structures within the flesh are free floating and must be maintained in their original position to guarantee the survival of the coral.

    Value of chalice frags is often set by the quantity of eyes included, so don't devalue them by cutting them in half.

    As with all LPS corals, survival and growth rate after fragging can be greatly increased by avoiding as many polyps as possible while cutting.

    [video=youtube;erxeQuErP0U]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erxeQuErP0U[/video]
    Cuts are sped up 8x

    If there's a specific species of coral that you would like to see cut up, feel free to comment in this thread or send me a PM.
     
  2. sethsolomon

    sethsolomon Shark M.A.S.C Club Member

    Is there a post for fragging fungias?
     
  3. Blindrage

    Blindrage Amphipod M.A.S.C Club Member

    I thought that was as simple as cutting them into 1 inch squares with scissors. DO NOT try that without confirmation from someone with a lot more experience though!
     
  4. sethsolomon

    sethsolomon Shark M.A.S.C Club Member

    I have done it once and pizza sliced it but only 3 of the 8 pieces survived.
     
  5. Munch

    Munch Shark M.A.S.C Club Member

    No gloves?
     
  6. sethsolomon

    sethsolomon Shark M.A.S.C Club Member

    I personally only use gloves when fragging zoas and pallys.
     
  7. mikejrice

    mikejrice Sardine Platinum Sponsor M.A.S.C Club Member

    [attachment=65971:name]
     

    Attached Files:

  8. DyM

    DyM Sardine M.A.S.C Club Member

    I use stainless steel bone cutters for all sps. I'd gladly use a saw if I had access to or owned one. Great documentation for sure!!!!!
     
  9. sethsolomon

    sethsolomon Shark M.A.S.C Club Member


    Might check with Mike and see if he can order you one :) If I remember right they cost about $300 and work awesome!
     
  10. mikejrice

    mikejrice Sardine Platinum Sponsor M.A.S.C Club Member

    [attachment=66000:name]
     

    Attached Files:

  11. mikejrice

    mikejrice Sardine Platinum Sponsor M.A.S.C Club Member

    [attachment=67170:name]
     

    Attached Files:

  12. mikejrice

    mikejrice Sardine Platinum Sponsor M.A.S.C Club Member

    [video=youtube;72JNRZDi1vs]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72JNRZDi1vs[/video]
     

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