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Quest Multi Tank

Discussion in 'Tank Builds' started by MuralReef, Nov 21, 2019.

  1. MuralReef

    MuralReef Shark Staff Member M.A.S.C Club Member M.A.S.C. B.O.D. MASC Vice-President

    So a huge thanks to Cris Capp and Rob Mougey to start this thread. Here is the new to us but AA system that will be going into the elementary science lab. We are not sure what the plan is yet. It may end up being a freshwater system but I’m working the salt angle pretty hard. [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    SynDen and Haddonisreef like this.
  2. Haddonisreef

    Haddonisreef Kraken M.A.S.C Club Member

    Awesome! Way to start them young!!
     
    MuralReef likes this.
  3. TheRealChrisBrown

    TheRealChrisBrown Tuna Staff Member M.A.S.C Club Member M.A.S.C. B.O.D. B.O.D. Member-at-Large

    My first thought was some kind of clown fish breeding system...where you could have various stages of the development. But I think that would be a TON of work, and each tank is divided but I'd guess the fry could easily swim through the little slats.

    Looks good though!
     
  4. Andrew_bram

    Andrew_bram Shark M.A.S.C Club Member

    Each student could do there own mini reef. Then next year you could frag everything and start over. Have them research a biome and re create. It would be interesting to see if someone does sea grasses or softies.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
     
  5. MuralReef

    MuralReef Shark Staff Member M.A.S.C Club Member M.A.S.C. B.O.D. MASC Vice-President

    I am trying to make sure that whatever we end up doing it isn't another thing for me to take care of. I want the kids to own this one.
     
    TheRealChrisBrown likes this.
  6. scmountain

    scmountain Copepod

    sadly you know freshwater (non planted) is the easiest. like Andrew suggested each individual student or group gets a "tank" they can put in what they want and keep it alive.
    in 4th grade we all had to keep a snail alive for 1 month. I am 30 and still remember that fondly
     
  7. MuralReef

    MuralReef Shark Staff Member M.A.S.C Club Member M.A.S.C. B.O.D. MASC Vice-President

    I hate to say that fresh is probably the way to go. I am thinking of doing shrimp on the top section or two.
     
  8. MuralReef

    MuralReef Shark Staff Member M.A.S.C Club Member M.A.S.C. B.O.D. MASC Vice-President

    Also thinking simple plants. It came with LED strip lights that will throw enough to grow a lot easy plants like crypts and such. Plants will also be really good for the shrimp and copepods.
     
  9. jda123

    jda123 Tuna M.A.S.C Club Member

    Smaller African Cichlids... like Tanganyika and Victorians. They are hardy and will easily have babies which can do the whole circle of life lesson. They don't mind if you don't do much maintenance as long as they get fed... and water changes are easy.

    Some of the Victorian Haps (obliqudens, for example) are as beautiful as they get and you can have a nice less about males needing to be colorful to attract female, and all of that stuff.

    Some of these fish are 2-3 inches max.

    I always recommend Africans to people who want saltwater fish since they can be just as beautiful with about 10% of the work and knowledge.
     
    SkyShark likes this.

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